20 September 2007

Method in the madness

That was almost perfect limited-overs batting from India. An almost old-fashioned assault on English bowling, it was an exhibition of how, when batting first, wickets in hand can be converted into runs on the board. Top marks to Sehwag, Gambhir, and of course, the man of the moment, Yuvraj Singh for a clinical batting display. Of course, we could crib over how Uthappa was foolish to lose his wicket, but the 21 year old has hopefully learnt his lesson.

Sreesanth hasn't learnt anything! Of course I could keep heaping blame on Prasad, but if Sreesanth cannot clean up his act now, there is real danger that he could be the next Agarkar. Agarkar has been the one constant in India's fast bowling over the last decade. Nehra, Mohanty, Tinu Yohannan, Harvinder Singh, T Kumaran, Balaji et al have all come and gone. He has bowled alongside Srinath and also with Pathan. A man of immense promise like Agarkar, he will always be on the fringes of national selection, because of an athletic disposition that makes him less likely to get injured - like Agarkar. Going on with the comparison, both of them had dream starts to their careers, Agarkar becoming the fastest ever bowler to reach fifty wickets. Sreesanth had a sensational tour of South Africa. However, very early on their careers, both of them also displayed an inability to stick to a plan. Neither seems to believe in the notion that when things are not going your way, drying up runs can produce wickets. It comes as no surprise then that Agarkar's golden run in Australia in 2003, was a result of fantastic attacking bowling, built on a foundation of simple line-and-length. He was the most economical and also the only one among himself, Zaheer, Nehra and Pathan to play all four Test matches and that says a story.

Sreesanth has a lot to learn from Agarkar's career. For a person on the selection radar for ten years now, Agarkar has only played 26 Test matches. In contrast, an injury and inconsistency-ridden Steve Harmison, has already played 54 in the six years that he has been around. And for those who think Harmison is not an appropriate comparison, Mohammed Sami who had a glittering start to his career in 2001, has played 30 Test matches. Irfan Pathan, despite being in the wilderness for a year, has played 25 Tests since his debut in 2003.

And finally a word on a man who I have always looked at suspiciously. I never thought he looked the sort of bowler who could cut it at the international level. Arpy Singh did really well to pull the Indian bowling back into some kind of rhythm yesterday, continuing an impressive run over the last couple of months. Hopefully he can remain fit, and continue bowling with the same sort of accuracy. It is always useful to have more than four fast bowlers to pick from.

4 comments:

Sumit Chakraberty said...

perhaps sreesanth should give up that scratch of his temple at the top of bowling mark which is the latest addition to his repertoire. anyway, i like his bowling and i'm sure more exposure to seaming conditions will settle him down. unlike agarkar, who is a bit of a slinger which makes it easy to put him away, he gets his wrist nicely behind the ball, gets the seam up and hits the deck. (anyway, let's not start another agarkar debate :)

Soulberry said...

Sreesanth did clean up his act! C'mon John, when everbody's becoming parochial, as in Rohit's case, a bit of home encouragement for Sree is good. The carrot rather than the stick.

He's a boy, he's good...somewhere his mind wandered off for a while, but I think he's bringing it back by the grace of Swami Aiyyappa.

He said as much in a vernacular that his SA success went to his head. (source, my friend N.Balajhi aka Straightdrive from Coimbatore...I didn't get the name of that vernacular journal.)

That boy is our Waqar Younis...not Ajt Agarkar. I wouldn't wish an Ugharkar Curse on my worst enemy.

John said...

Soulberry, trust me, I am Sree's biggest fan, and I believe he's as talented as any seamer we've ever had, and I certainly don't wish he ends up like Agarkar. He also seems to have some sort of ability to stay away from injury, and also seems a decent fielder - which is not what we can say about our other fast bowlers, barring Ajit.

Which means that if he can just get his head right, he could just be the best bowler we've ever had. Typical Mallu lack of restraint isn't helping matters, though.

Anonymous said...

wow gold
wow gold
wow power leveling
wow power leveling
wow power leveling
wow powerleveling
wow powerleveling
wow powerleveling
World Of Warcraft power leveling
World Of Warcraft power leveling
World Of Warcraft power leveling
World Of Warcraft powerleveling
World Of Warcraft powerleveling
World Of Warcraft powerleveling
wow power level
wow power level
wow power level
cheap wow power leveling
cheap wow power leveling
cheap wow powerleveling
cheap wow powerleveling
codeheart article
Warcraft Gold
World of Warcraft Gold
cheap wow gold